Categories
First Semester

MPA 502: Development Management-I

The objective of this course is to provide a broad knowledge of theories and dimensions of development management and make students able to analyze the issues related to development management.

Course Contents

Unit 1: Introduction to Development Management (LH 12)
  • Development: concept, nature, philosophy and dimensions of development
  • Growth with redistributive justice
  • Emergence and overview of development administration
  • Concept of development management
Unit 2: Comparative Public Administration (LH 14)
  • Genesis of comparative public administration (CPA)
  • Models and approaches of CPA: bureaucratic model, ecological model, structural-functional model, agraria-industria and fused-prismatic-diffracted model; prismatic sala model
  • Concept of endogenous and exogenous development
Unit 3: Institution Building (LH 6)
  • Concept of organization and institution
  • Institution building and its model
Unit 4: Capabilities of a State and Bottom up Approaches to Development (LH 8)
  • Concept of nation building and state building
  • Decentralization
  • People’s participation
  • Public private partnership (PPP)
Unit 5: Social Change and Planning for Development (LH 8)
  • Social change: concept, factors and process
  • Resource bases and resource mobilization
  • Concept of development planning (Macro, meso & micro-planning)
  • Monitoring and evaluation of development plan in Nepal

References

  • Bhargav, S. (Ed.) (2007). Developmental Aspects of Entrepreneurship. New Delhi: Response Books.
  • Bhatta, B. D. (2005). Vikas Prashshan. Kathmandu: Indira Bhatta.
  • Bhatta, B. D. (1988). Development Management. Kathmandu: Abhasdev Bhatta.
  • Bongartz, H. & Dahal, D. R. (1996). Development Studies: Self-help Organization, NGOs and Civil Society. Kathmandu: Nepal Foundation for Advanced Studies.
  • Carcknell, B. E. (2002). Evaluating Development Aid: Issues Problems and Solutions. New Delhi: Sage Publications.
  • Center for Empowerment Innovation and Development (2072). Development Management. Kathmandu: Pairabi Prakashan.
  • Charles, K. J. (1983). Total Development: Essay Towards an integration of Marxian and Gandhian Perspectives. New Delhi: Vika Publishing House Pvt Ltd.
  • Chatterjee, S. K. (1990). Development Administration. Delhi: Surjeet Publications.
  • Dale, R. (2004). Evaluating Development Programs and Projects, New Delhi: Sage Publication.
  • Dreze, J. A. & Sen, A. (Eds.) (2005). Indian Development. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Gallagher, K. P. (Ed.) (2005). Putting Development First. London: ZED Books.
  • Gasper, D. (2004). The Ethics of Development. New Delhi: Vistaar Publications.
  • Jomo, K. S. & Ben, F. (Eds.) (2006). The New Development Economics. New Delhi: Tulika Books.
  • Joseph, T. M. (2009). Decentralised Governance and Development. New Delhi: Deep and Deep Publications.
  • Kafle, N. P. (2063). Development Administration. Kathmandu: Phulchooki Publication and Distributions.
  • Kothari, U. (Ed.) (2005). A Radical History of Development Studies: Individuals, Institutions and Ideologies. South Africa: New Africa Books.
  • Mose, D. (2005). Cultivating Development: An Ethnography of Aid Policy and Practice. New Delhi: Vistaar Publications.
  • Palekar, S. A. (2012). Development Administration. New Delhi:PHI Learning Private Limited.
  • Pandey, D. R. (2009). Nepal’s Failed Development. Kathmandu: Nepal South Asia Center.
  • Pandey, Y. R. (2072). Development Management. Kathmandu: Vidyrthi Pustak Bhandar.
  • Paudel, N. R. (2014). Development Management. Kathmandu: Srijana Pahari.
  • Peet, R. (2005). Theories of Development. Jaipur: Rawat Publications.
  • Pieterse, J. N. (2001). Development Theory: Deconstructions/ Reconstructions. New Delhi: Vistaar Publications.
  • Pieterse, J. N. (2010). Development Theory. New Delhi: Sage Publications.
  • Sapru, R. K. (2003). Development Administration. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Pvt. Ltd.
  • Seligson, M. A. & Smith J. T. (Ed.) (2010). Development and Under Development: The Political Economy of Global Inequality. New Delhi: Viva Books.
  • Sen, A. (2016). Development as Freedom. New Delhi: Oxford University Press.
  • Singh, A. (1981). Development Administration. Delhi: Shree Publishing House.
Categories
First Semester

MPA 504: Public Finance

The objective of this course is to provide students with the basic knowledge of public sector economics and fiscal administration so as to make them competent and capable in understanding its evolution, principles and theories together with the significance of the public financial operation in the modern era.

Course Contents

Unit 1: Introduction to Public Finance (10 LH)
  • Concept, nature, scope and significance of public finance
  • Functions of public finance: allocation, distribution and stabilization
  • Fiscal policy: concept, objectives and scope
Unit 2: Public Revenue       (10 LH)
  • Concept of public revenue, cannons of taxation, principles of taxation: benefit principle and ability to pay principle
  • Characteristics of effective tax system, revenue administration
Unit 3: Public Expenditure (10 LH)
  • Concept, structure and principles of public expenditure, pattern of public expenditure, public expenditure financial accountability (PEFA)
Unit 4: Public Debt (10 LH)
  • Concept and need of public debt
  • Sources and structure of public debt
  • Burden of public debt
  • Principles of debt management
Unit 5: Budgeting (LH 8)
  • Concept of government budgeting
  • Theories of budgeting: classical and modern concepts of budgeting
  • Types of budgeting
  • Process of government budgeting in Nepal and medium-term expenditure framework (MTEF)

References

  • Adhikari, H. P. (2007). Public Finance. Kathmandu: Renuka Kattel.
  • Adhikari, H. P. (2018). Aspects of Public Finance. Kathmandu: Image Adhikari.
  • Bhatia, H. L. (2010). Public Finance.New Delhi: Vikas Publishing House Pvt. Ltd.
  • Bista, B. (2061). Public Finance Theory and Practice. Kathmandu: Pairbi Prakashan.
  • David, B. F. & Duncombe, B. F. (1972). Public Finance. New York: Holt Rinehart and Winston Inc.
  • Hockley, G. (1979). Public Finance. London: Routledge.
  • Joshi, S. (2060). Public Economics. Kathmandu: Taleju Prakashan.
  • Kandel, P. R. (2061). Nepalko Sarbjanik Bitta Vybasthapanka Khi Pakshyharu. Kathmandu: Buddha Academic Publishers.
  • Lekhi, R. K. (1995). Public Finance. New Delhi: Kalyani Publishers.
  • Lekhi, R. K. & Singh, J. (2014). The Economics of Development and Planning. New Delhi: Kalyani Publishers.
  • Mehta, J. K. (1975). Public Finance. Allahabad: Kitab Mahal.
  • Singh, S. K. (2001). Public Finance. New Delhi: S. Chand & Company Ltd.
  • Singh, S. K. (2010). Public Finance: In the Theory and Practice. New Delhi: S. Chand and Company Pvt. Ltd.
  • Sundharam, K. P. M. & Andley, K. K. (1998). Public Finance: Theory and Practice. New Delhi: S Chand & Company Ltd.
  • Sundharam, K. P. M. & Andley, K. K. (2003). Public Finance: Theory and Practice. New Delhi: S Chand & Company Ltd.
  • Taylor, P. (1961). The Economics of Public Finance. Calcutta: Oxford and IBH Publishing Company.
  • Tyagi, B. P. (2004). Public Finance. Meerut: Jai Prakash Nath & Company.
Categories
Development Management Fourth Semester

DM 632: Development Planning and Project Management

The objective of this course is to provide knowledge to the students on basic problems and techniques in development planning including socio-cultural and economic conditions required for development, different stages of plan formulation and quantitative planning techniques. It also provides knowledge to the students on basic concepts, theories and analytical techniques of Project Management.

Course Contents

Unit 1: Introduction to Planning and Project Management            (LH 10)
  • Concept of poverty, inequality, and development
  • Introduction to economic growth and development
  • Concept of plan, program and project
  • Relations between plan and project
  • Concept of project management
Unit 2: Project Planning    (LH 8)
  • Project identification: problem tree and objective tree
  • Stages of project and its cycle
  • Feasibility study and preparation of project report
Unit 3: Project Appraisal   (LH 12)
  • Concept of project appraisal, cash flow analysis; discounting and non-discounting techniques
  • Economic and social cost benefit analysis, risk, uncertainty and sensitivity analysis; environmental analysis
Unit 4: Project Implementation   (LH 10)
  • Project organization; network analysis: PERT and CPM
  • Project control: budgeting, financial management, inventory management
  • Project management information system (PMIS)
Unit 5: Monitoring and Evaluation         (LH 8)
  • Need for monitoring & evaluation of project
  • Logical framework approach; project monitoring and evaluation system adopted by National Planning Commission
  • Evaluation approaches adopted by international organizations (UNIDO & the World Bank), Case study            

References

  • Agrawal, G. R. (2014). Project Management. Kathmandu: M.K. Publishers and Distributer.
  • Chandra, P. (1999). Projects: Planning Analysis Selection Implementation and Review. New Delhi: Tata McGraw-Hill Publishing Company Limited.
  • Chaudhary, S. (2001). Project Management. New Delhi: Tata Mc Graw –Hill Publishing Company Limited.
  • Joy, P. K. (1999). Total Project Management: The Indian Context. Delhi: Machmilin India Limited.
  • Kerzner, H. (2004). Project management: A Systems Approach to Planning Scheduling and Controlling.
  • Little, I. M. D. & Mirrless, J. A. (1974). Project Appraisal and Planning for Developing Countries. New Delhi: Oxford and IBH Publishers Company.
  • Meredith, J. & Mantel, S. J. (1989). Project Management. New York: John Wiley & Sons Inc.
  • Rijal, P. R. (2059). Essential of Project appraisal and Management. Kathmandu: Kastamandap Academic Enterprise.
  • Sharma, B. P. (2006). Project management: Planning, Analysis and Control. Kathmandu: Ekta Books.
  • Todaro, M. P. & Stephen, C. S. (2013). Economic Development (11th ed.). New York: Addison-Wesley.